Category Archives: life cycle

What inspires us

I am reminded of this work that I did.

When I took on this project, I had no clue about quilts or sewing. When I gathered quilting fabric and materials at the sewing store, I was laughed at by a local quilter for thinking it be easy to build a quilt. The truth is, I knew we’d do this as a team. And this we totally did.  I knew from my contact who was helping to support me that the Elders loved to do activities together and especially creative activities. I also knew, we’d work together, and our project would be a unique one.

One of my favourite thing was when we built our self portraits, which was the basis for the quilt activity. I took a Reggio learning activity, Reggio being one of my favourite early learning.  Building self portraits was and is so important for all of us. What and how we perceive ourselves, how we are known in the community and in our families? What stories do we share? What are our favourite colours? Places? Partners? Lovers? Children? How do we see ourselves? What is important to us? What are events in your life that you want to share about? What do you love to do?

What was shared by the Elders was phenomenal. I learned so many stories from them, that they could fill volumes. If you get a chance, you can see the quilt at the Friendship Centre in the basement where they run their programs which really is a niche for them.

Using this model to work with the Elders was really inspiring. During my time with them we worked in different spaces with them including the Baggage Arts Building, The Art Gallery.  I still work with the Elders in my work, and really believe in the work of  Loris Malaguzz  is built on a solid foundation of philosophical principles and extensive experiences and is truly a way of building something solid.

The work with the Elders was so much, and there is still so much to explore and build upon,

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/thunder-bay/human-rights-quilt-stitched-with-stories-from-thunder-bay-elders-1.2929516

Indigenous Knowledge Conference, November 13-14, 2018.

beSuperior Consulting operates out of Thunder Bay, Ontario Canada.

Being located in the north end of Ontario, means that offering an Indigenous Knowledge Conference here provides a unique opportunity for Education Directors, Health Directors, Entrepreneurs, Educators, Leadership and Chiefs and Delegates, Frontline Workers in all sectors, Elders, and youth and Professional Staff to come together for two days, to have a unique opportunity to experience What Indigenous Knowledge is. While  a conference setting is perhaps limiting as it is not on the Land, beSuperior wants to bring people together still, to think, remember, experience and show support for Indigenous Knowledge and the ones who truly ignite and work in this field often with little or no support.

The purpose of coming together is to build a place where connections can happen. What happens in events such as this is good for the spirit and good energy, it is also a place of transformation, change and new experiences.

Over the past two conferences as it was decided these would be offered twice a year, opportunities to bring together people where old and new ideas have shifted.

I envision a time where this knowledge is offered to all learners where all learners including my children and your children will know that we are holding space for them. Where it is okay and honoured to share without judgement with the intent of claiming, doing, believing and being ok with knowing this is a very old and sacred space.

As visionaries and writers we have been holding space for a long time. Having opportunities to share our insight deeply and carefully shows our tenacious love. Love is what keeps us doing what we do each day, from the early morning to the evening, and everything in between.

Details still coming.

Tickets are up on Eventbrite: Tickets

Speakers and facilitators please reach out to besuperiorlearning@gmail.com by September 14, 2018.

Tahlequah

pod

Goodbye little one and may your spirit soar in with the ocean salt and other babies that you will meet on your journey, and ancestors, your strong Mother Orca who demonstrates so much love and courage, swim on, and Tahlequah know we were grieving with you, and are still grieving by your side

The orca represents many different attitudes and ideas, often revolving around luck, compassion and family. They are known to some tribes as the guardians of the sea, protecting the people (especially sea travellers) against sea monsters. Because of their strong group behaviour orcas represent the strength of love and the bonds of family.

Boas tribes believed that if you saw a killer whale pass by and spat seawater towards it, the killer whale would heal your illnesses.

The Lummi Nation talks about answering the call to help  another injured Orca, during this ordeal, which is another Orca related to the pod.  A vet who tried to help out“ As a veterinarian, at the end of the day it’s caring about animals, which is my driver and the big driver for all the folks that have come to aid J50,” said Haulena.

“It is why I do what I do, to come to the aid of an animal, in particular an endangered species living right in our back yard.”Scientists want to do everything possible to keep J50 alive because of her reproductive potential. The whale has always been smaller and shorter than a typical orca whale at her age, but has not gained weight as expected.

So many teachings about Orcas, here are a few:

  • Female orcas have been having pregnancy problems because of nutritional stress linked to lack of salmon.
  • This calf cited to be the first born in three years of this pod.’
  • The death of the orca calf is a heartbreaking reminder of the urgency we face in saving these iconic animals,’ the governor’s spokesman Jaime Smith wrote in an email.
  • The orcas are distinct from other killer whales because they eat salmon rather than marine mammals.
  • “To learn the orcas’ natural and cultural history is to understand how closely connected a mother and calf are, how tight-knit their bond.” Mother orcas have a unique bond with their offspring, who rarely leave their mothers’ sides.

Sources:

Grieving and Orcas

Salmon and Orca

https://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/environment/after-17-days-and-1000-miles-mother-orca-tahlequah-drops-her-dead-calf/

Lummi Nation

Indigenous