Indigenous Knowledge Conference with a focus on Mentoring a Generation of Leaders

beSuperior will be hosting an Indigenous Knowledge Conference in the Fall in Thunder Bay with the Title “Mentoring a Generation of Leaders’

The focus of this Professional Development opportunity will be determined as time and effort to hear from prospective presenters. If you feel you’d like to present please submit your information to me at besuperiorlearning@gmail.com

There are many themes to look upon which are the layers of support we need to do what we need to do well: Land based, resilience, family, self care, wellness, safety, cultural teachings, health, education, mentoring, & entrepreneurship.

I have a larger vision of building more supports for youth.  Identifying what this means, and how this looks for the north shore of Lake Superior.

While the conference will have an approach of Indigenous Methodologies, the conference will focus on being as open to partnerships and in recognition of making helping to support better relationships and build support.

Parameters of presenters should fall under:

Respectful: what is it that I have to offer that relates to respect.

Relevance: what or how or why is what I have to share relevant.

Reciprocity: how does what I have to offer give back to the community, and even lending itself to sustainability? Or what or how is this sustainable?

Funders

At the moment, beSuperior will be seeking funders who can help to support this conference.

 

 

Indigenous Women Entrepreneurs, Alberta

https://www.cbc.ca/news/indigenous/indigenous-women-entrepreneur-business-ibc-1.4170906

“The social change comes when a person gets access to that capital. They get a job, increase their income, start eating better, get pride of ownership — it’s a win-win for everybody.”
Calgary-based First Nations entrepreneur Nicole Robertson also got her start with IBC. After working as a reporter across Canada, she started an award-winning media production company 15 years ago.
She said if it wasn’t for IBC, she wouldn’t have gone very far because she didn’t have a lot of assets when she started out.
“If I didn’t have them as a backup, what would I do? I wouldn’t have been able to do it any other way, when I looked at what a bank traditionally looks at,” said Robertson.
“But I built the relationship with IBC, I paid my loans always on time. They treat you like a human being, rather than just a number or policy.”
Being a successful woman in business is empowering, she said, especially considering the historical trauma that has held a lot of Indigenous women back.
Both Robertson and Solway hope to see more Indigenous women take the leap of faith to help change the landscape of business.
“We’re smart, with valuable abilities,” said Solway.
“So our ladies can flourish, can be out there, be proactive and not give up. We see too much of them giving up on their pride. We’ve gone through enough, but we need to move on now. We need to do something with ourselves.”

 

Using Instagram

See this Forbes article which features Celinne Da Costa is an international life design and story coach story on how she used Instagram to grow her business.

Da Costa writes:

I started to take my Instagram account seriously in the beginning of 2016, after I realized that people were making money from it. I developed a content strategy and began carefully curating my content, trading in the selfies and oversimplified emoji captions for highly visual and professional images that involved travel, lifestyle, and design, as well as captions that focused on storytelling. Visual cohesion and a compelling tone of voice are extremely important when it comes to creating a successful Instagram account.
I built my personal brand by positioning myself as a marketing and brand strategist, photographer, and graphic designer. As my Instagram grew, I began to get inquiries via email and Direct Message from companies who found me through the platform or my blog and were interested in my work. Clients also found me through my use of hashtags, geotags, user recommendations, the Explore page, comments on similar user’s pages, and interaction with their content.