Tying up the Leadership Conference on Mentoring a New Generation of Leaders

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Its been a week since the conference has completed itself. As everyone journeyed and left the day of, I wanted to make sure to touch base and say thank you to each and everyone who attended. The sharing of knowledge was rich and many new and old ways were shared. I kept hearing how we need to do more of this. This seems to be common in the professional development that I have offered is the need to do more. As hugs were given, pictures taken, moments documented with iphones. Presentations shared. The much work that goes into events, sort of reminds me of the amount of time when preparing a feast. You want to bring your personal best. Then as the presentation happens, and the digest occurs of knowledge, it is soon done. So what than do we capture? How then do we proceed? I took videos of the Regional Chief’s speech which I will share here on my page, and I did take other photos which I did share to Instagram, and some to Twitter. I will be taking some time to go back in and gather up the main themes so that they can be built on. From each speaker I am going to compile one main idea that I remember from their presentation and speech;

Hal EagleTail: Opening & Closing, is important as it grounds and offers the prayers and spiritual guidance.

Chief Lee Crowchild: One theme on kinship and how important this is as well as acceptance and in building relationships, especially in thinking about the far reaching relationships that our children and grand children will have. The importance of recognizing relationality.

Chief RoseAnne Archibald: Speaking to many themes, what did stand out is the importance of Diversity in leadership and in valuing all the ways leaderships is expressed. Also that bringing the spirit of heart centred leadership allows for an open exchange.

Noella (Little Mustache) Wells spoke the importance of Elder respect, and protocols when asking for their expertise, and in this case, with post secondary institutes. Much clarity around the significance of Elders and Knowledge Keepers in the work to support learners, and in building good spaces in institutions to foster and support reconciliation, leadership and respect.

Gerald Ratt Ai’ssoo spoke on leadership and how youth are lacking and that youth are needing this care, attention and support. Gerald’s multi tiered presentation spoke to this succinctly which included youth he has worked with across the country whom he included in on his presentation.

Elections Canada was interactive and shared historical narratives of the vote, and also included interactive activities, which got us all moving and experiencing what this process feels like. As well they drew up a mock vote, where we all voted upon priorities: ours included- including the TRC in curriculum, housing.. for example.

Crystal Manyfingers & Darmondy Mumford delivered their presentation on how culturally relevant teaching has impacted their learners in a positive way sharing how they use space and Land within the City of Calgary, in this case, Fort Calgary, and in teaching Math to learners and using the theme of building a tipi. Inspiring to hear!

Christina Fox Iixsisaanoowa shared from her story and book which she is writing and talked about her experiences growing up and the impacts of the IRS on her life. She shared her life experience so honestly and kindly, as well as beautiful art which she designed. So much detail and expressions.

I shared how she draws from Indigenous Methodologies to build her work and what this looks like on an entrepreneur side of things.

Russelle Burns shared on her perspectives from the Awotaan Healing Lodge and how they provide programming for youth that is rooted in cultural knowledge.

This brief overview is a simple acknowledgement of the hard work. I will be compiling a report, as well as asking for copies of presentations to be shared.

Thank you!

Indigenous Women Entrepreneurs, Alberta

design, entrepreneurship, help, Indigenous women

https://www.cbc.ca/news/indigenous/indigenous-women-entrepreneur-business-ibc-1.4170906

“The social change comes when a person gets access to that capital. They get a job, increase their income, start eating better, get pride of ownership — it’s a win-win for everybody.”
Calgary-based First Nations entrepreneur Nicole Robertson also got her start with IBC. After working as a reporter across Canada, she started an award-winning media production company 15 years ago.
She said if it wasn’t for IBC, she wouldn’t have gone very far because she didn’t have a lot of assets when she started out.
“If I didn’t have them as a backup, what would I do? I wouldn’t have been able to do it any other way, when I looked at what a bank traditionally looks at,” said Robertson.
“But I built the relationship with IBC, I paid my loans always on time. They treat you like a human being, rather than just a number or policy.”
Being a successful woman in business is empowering, she said, especially considering the historical trauma that has held a lot of Indigenous women back.
Both Robertson and Solway hope to see more Indigenous women take the leap of faith to help change the landscape of business.
“We’re smart, with valuable abilities,” said Solway.
“So our ladies can flourish, can be out there, be proactive and not give up. We see too much of them giving up on their pride. We’ve gone through enough, but we need to move on now. We need to do something with ourselves.”

 

Using Instagram

entrepreneur, entrepreneurship, freedom, innovation, Leadership, mentor, online, passions, teaching, tribe, true north, vibe, vision, Voice

See this Forbes article which features Celinne Da Costa is an international life design and story coach story on how she used Instagram to grow her business.

Da Costa writes:

I started to take my Instagram account seriously in the beginning of 2016, after I realized that people were making money from it. I developed a content strategy and began carefully curating my content, trading in the selfies and oversimplified emoji captions for highly visual and professional images that involved travel, lifestyle, and design, as well as captions that focused on storytelling. Visual cohesion and a compelling tone of voice are extremely important when it comes to creating a successful Instagram account.
I built my personal brand by positioning myself as a marketing and brand strategist, photographer, and graphic designer. As my Instagram grew, I began to get inquiries via email and Direct Message from companies who found me through the platform or my blog and were interested in my work. Clients also found me through my use of hashtags, geotags, user recommendations, the Explore page, comments on similar user’s pages, and interaction with their content.

 

Entrepreneurship & Tribes

Leadership, Professional Development

shallow focus photography of sunflower

Photo by Brett Sayles on Pexels.com

You want to make a difference. You are not sure how. One way is through developing your own business because here is where you can develop your tribe and elevate your vibe.

There are many examples of entrepreneurs who did one thing and one thing only: they followed their heart.

Depending on your circumstances, or story, entrepreneurship may be the exact thing you need. When I ventured down the journey myself, I felt consultant was the correct name for my line of work given the length of years I spent in education it seemed right. After all some of my competitors may have a higher education but 0 time spent in a job. That is 100% true. Some people with a PhD which I think could be one of my main competitors, have went from high school, to university to the Masters and straight up to the PhD. Some within the same institution! Some with some job experience. Chosing what works for you, because maybe you have lived experiences, and if you were to do an inventory of all that you have to offer, is those direct experiences, which means that is your unique skill set, which technically you can also become a consultant or specialist in.  Here is an example of a young entrepreneur who did not want to see her own grandmother without services and seen a gap, so built a business on it. Cleary her tribe is around providing that care for her grandmother and other Elders in the same situation. Her tribe, a helping one.  We all have that fire within us.

This family owned business states:

An exceptional team, including sister Avery, who heads operations, is vital too. “We hire for heart and soul,” says Hamilton, explaining that before each hire she asks, Would I want this person caring for my loved one? “You have to truly care. It’s not a job, it’s a calling. If you focus on that, clients feel it.”

That family members bring personal knowledge, experience and passion is also meaningful. “If I just wanted to make money, I could have chosen a hundred other industries,” says Hamilton, whose seen many jump into the field only to leave soon thereafter, unable to deal with the challenges. “You need to be in this because you’re passionate about exceptional care and about people being treated with the dignity and respect they deserve,” she adds. “It isn’t an easy industry, but it’s very fulfilling – if you’re in it for the right reasons.

Caring for Elders